What Was the March on Washington?

What Was the March on Washington

Originally posted on Kid Lit About Politics.

What Was the March on Washington? Written by Kathleen Krull. Illustrated by Tim Tomkinson. Grosset & Dunlap, a division of Penguin Young Readers Group, 2013. 128 pages. Publisher recommends for ages 8 to 12. ISBN: 9780448462875.

I was five years old on August 28, 1963. I remember that my brother and I stayed with neighbors while my parents rode on a school bus from New Jersey to Washington DC. My brother, who was almost two, cried all night long and kept me awake. I was forced to eat a tomato at dinner. My parents came home and talked about how hard it was to sleep on a school bus and how hot it was in Washington. I thought they had done something very important by going to the March. I knew they enjoyed the camaraderie of the day, but they never told me anything about the speakers or the singers.

In reading “What Was the March on Washington?” I found out much more about the March. I now know about the meticulous planning that went into the March. I know about the people, 250,000 people arriving on bus after bus and train after train. I know the path the March took. I’ve always known that Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. delivered his “I Have a Dream” speech at the March. But now I know all the other speakers and singers, and I know that Dr. King stopped reading from his speech and started speaking from his heart when he began talking about his dream.

Krull presents all this information very clearly. She starts by describing the racism that existed in this country at that time, and also the key events of the Civil Rights struggle before the March. After that she explains the extensive preparation for the March, undertaken by Randolph and by Bayard Rustin. She talks at length about the March itself, and then addresses the time after the March: the death of JFK, the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the death of Dr. King.

In the middle of the book are 16 pages of black-and-white photos. The book has many black-and-white drawings, mostly of the people involved. It helps to have those images in one’s mind when reading about the people. At the end there’s a timeline and a bibliography.

The book is fun to read, and I’m so glad to know more about what my parents saw and heard while I was gagging on a tomato.

Blog Reviews:

Helen Foster James

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This entry was posted in Books and tagged , , , , , , , by Liz Parrott. Bookmark the permalink.

About Liz Parrott

I love the Kid Lit community: the authors, the illustrators, the editors, the teachers, the librarians. I love the blogs, the listservs, the twitter feeds and the pinterest boards. I'm in the process of creating the Kid Lit Navigator. I'm hoping this website will be a reference tool for navigating the Kid Lit world. I have a second project, Kid Lit About Politics, which isn't getting the attention it deserves these days. All my time is going into Kid Lit Navigator. Kid Lit About Politics combines my love children's and YA literature and my love politics. It's a blog in which I review children's and YA lit about politics. I have a BA in English from Oberlin College and an MLIS from UC Berkeley. I worked for a time as a school librarian in a Montessori school.

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