Blogging on the Earth

Blogging about Nature:  Introducing Garry Rogers on the League of Bloggers for a Better World

GarryRogers

Garry Rogers

My blog posts are about nature, about wildlife and its habitat (posts). They are expressions of my concerns for natural conditions and events.

During the past year, 2015, lethal heat waves and storms, decline of the great iconic species of elephants, lions, and rhinos, . . . read more.

2 cool maps that show how wind power is poised to go big — really big

Tanya’s comment: Wind power could grow enough to generate 35 percent of U.S. electricity by 2050. Looks like renewable energy has a real chance at one day replacing fossil fuels.

Grist

Wind turbines have only a tenuous link to most Americans’ daily lives because wind farms generate less than 5 percent of all of the electricity produced today.

As reducing greenhouse gas emissions to slow climate change becomes more urgent, though, wind is expected to become one of the country’s largest sources of energy by midcentury. The U.S. Department of Energy has published two new maps that put that future in more concrete terms.

Projected growth of the wind industry over the next 35 years.Projected growth of the wind industry over the next 35 years.Department of Energy

The first is part of a report released this spring showing how wind power could grow enough to generate 35 percent of U.S. electricity by 2050 — up from 10 percent in 2020 and 20 percent in 2030.

The map, called “Wind Vision,” shows how much wind power generating capacity each state had in 2000, 2010, and 2013, and Department of Energy…

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Study Finds U.S. Citizens Want to See Government Action on Climate Change

From Climate-Connections.org:

For U.S. politicians, taking a solid stance on climate change is like the kiss of death. They avoid it like bad breath. However, a new study shows that more than half of the voters surveyed want to see their governmental representatives taking “unilateral action” to fight against climate change. A “unilateral” stance would be interesting for the U.S. government, seeing as how it consistently refuses to cooperate on this issue with the rest of the world.